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Do You Panic Without Your Phone? You Might Have Nomophobia

Researchers at the University of Iowa have developed a test to help determine how attached and fearful people are when it comes to being without their cell phones.

| 2 min read

Researchers at the University of Iowa have developed a test to help determine how attached and fearful people are when it comes to being without their cell phones.

Let’s face it, some of us would feel naked without our cell phones — when we lose them, we panic, and when the battery suddenly dies, we scramble to find the nearest electrical outlet — but if you aren’t sure whether you have an actual fear of being away from your phone, there’s a test to help you figure that out.

SEE ALSO: Our Infatuation with Horror: Unraveled

Researchers from Iowa State University have developed a test to determine the level of attachment and fear people have when it comes to their cell phones.

Respond to the following statements on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). Calculate your total scores by adding the responses to each item. The higher scores corresponded to greater nomophobia severity.   

I would feel uncomfortable without constant access to information through my smartphone.

I would be annoyed if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.

Being unable to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone would make me nervous.

I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.

Running out of battery in my smartphone would scare me.

If I were to run out of credits or hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.

If I did not have a data signal or could not connect to Wi-Fi, then I would constantly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.

If I could not use my smartphone, I would be afraid of getting stranded somewhere.

If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it.    

If I did not have my smartphone with me:

I would feel anxious because I could not instantly communicate with my family and/or friends.

I would be worried because my family and/or friends could not reach me.

I would feel nervous because I would not be able to receive text messages and calls.

I would be anxious because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.

I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.

I would feel anxious because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.

I would be nervous because I would be disconnected from my online identity.

I would be uncomfortable because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.

I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.

I would feel anxious because I could not check my email messages.

I would feel weird because I would not know what to do.

 

You can learn more about “no mobile phone phobia” in this video from Iowa State University:

 

Based on materials provided by Iowa State University.

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